Month: May 2018

Marital Advice

I usually don’t advertise too many book on my site, but this is a winner. What a gift to men getting married, a man trying to understand women in general, a bachelor gift for a party, or anything relating to marriage for a man.

Peter Davison took a loving message to his grandson and turned it into a book to share with us. Go to Amazon.com and purchase this book. You’d be amazed at the advice.

As for us women, Peter told the truth, girls! We are complicated!!

.Marital Advice

When my grandson, Joel, got engaged, I decided to jot down a few words of marital wisdom for him, based on my vast experience as a husband. Then I thought, why share this wisdom with only one person when I can share it with the whole world. So, I started a blog, listing new marital advice every week. As the popularity of the blog grew, people suggested that the material should be turned into a book and, well, here it is! Sure, much of the advice is off-the-wall and wacky, but it’s also an upbeat, humorous look at married life that any engaged or married person can relate to and will find insightful and fun to read. Even unmarried people can enjoy the book and, who knows, it might convince some of you to take the plunge, or perhaps confirm your belief that being single is a blessing. Advice to Joel, and to any man, includes: make sure that you buy a roll of electrical tape before you volunteer to do the vacuuming–and why, how to deal with your wife’s steely-eyed, clinched-jaw scowl, known as “The Look,” how to answer your wife’s questions such as, “Does this dress make my ass look big?,” the warning that your mouth will get you into a whole lot more trouble than your Willy ever will, and how to create the world’s most powerful anniversary card for your wife. Virtually all of the material in the book is presented in the form of upbeat stories, scenarios, and examples. This is not the type of advice that you’ll find in a textbook on marriage or in a book on marital relations written by some psychiatrist. This is the real stuff for real people.

Alberta Sequeira
www.albertasequeira.wordpress.com
alberta.sequeira@gmail.com

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How to contact Agents with Trilogies

The Writer’s Dig Blog
How to Query an Agent When Writing a Trilogy (or Series)
By: Brian A. Klems | April 11, 2016

Questions-to-ask-an-agent: I’m currently finishing the first book in what I plan to be a trilogy and am getting ready to query agents. When I pitch the book, should I mention that this is the first book of a series or not? Do agents want to know it’s a series? What’s the best way to handle it?—Anonymous

A: Agents (and publishers, for that matter) are big fans of book series. If the first book is strong and flies off bookstore shelves, it’s a safe bet that its follow-ups will too. Most who run the publishing industry would practically sell the naming rights to their first-born child to land a Harry Potter or a Twilight. Heck, I’d have sold the naming-rights to both my daughters for a chance to write them.

Luckily for them, I’ve yet to land that golden ticket.

The key to selling a trilogy is selling the first book first. Without that sale, books two and three (or more, if it’s a longer series) are DOA. So focus your query letter on book one. Pitch it as if it weren’t in a trilogy—don’t mention future books, plots, etc. Stick to the strengths of book one and, if you find you can’t without mentioning the others, then book one has major flaws.

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Now this doesn’t mean you should keep your trilogy a secret, says Guide to Literary Agents editor Chuck Sambuchino. Just save it for a future conversation.

“If you propose your first book and they like it, they’ll contact you,” Sambuchino says. “One of the first questions they will ask, I promise you, will be, ‘What else are you working on or writing?’ And that’s when you say, ‘Well, I’m halfway through the second book in that series and I’ve got some outlines for other projects.’”

By following this method, you’ll avoid irritating agents who dislike queries about more than one book while doing no harm to ones that don’t care either way. And if you feel that you must mention it in your query letter, use the line “It’s a stand-alone book with series potential.”

Thanks for visiting The Writer’s Dig blog. For more great writing advice, click here.

Brian A. Klems is the editor of this blog, online editor of Writer’s Digest and author of the popular gift book Oh Boy, You’re Having a Girl: A Dad’s Survival Guide to Raising Daughters.